Recommended vaccinations for college students

 Immunizations are not just for children. Protection from some childhood vaccines can wear off over time. You may also be at risk for vaccine-preventable disease due to your age, job, lifestyle, travel, or health conditions.

 

vaccinesInfo

All adults need a seasonal flu (influenza) vaccine every year. Flu vaccine is especially important for people with chronic health conditions, pregnant women, and older adults. We offered at the SHC during appropriate months as October-March (until we ran out).

Every adult should get the Tdap vaccine once if they did not receive it as an adolescent to protect against pertussis (whooping cough), and then a Td (tetanus, diphtheria) booster shot every 10 years. In addition, women should get the Tdap vaccine each time they are pregnant, preferably at 27 through 36 weeks.

In addition to seasonal flu (influenza) vaccine and Td or Tdap vaccine (Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis), you should also get:

HPV vaccine which protects against the human papillomaviruses that causes most cervical cancers, anal cancer, and genital warts. It is recommended for:

*women up to age 26 years

*men up to age 21 years

*men ages 22-26 who have sex with men

Some vaccines may be recommended for adults because of particular job or school-related requirements, health conditions, lifestyle or other factors. For example, some states require students entering colleges and universities to be vaccinated against certain diseases like meningitis due to increased risk among college students living in residential housing, or to get the MMR vaccine against measles, mumps, and rubella.

 

Feel free to contact us or stop by to receive more information on these vaccines. We can refer you to an inexpensive place in the community.

Talk with your doctor or other healthcare professional to find out which vaccines are recommended for you at your next medical appointment.

More info: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/adults/index.html

 


 

Measles is a highly contagious disease that must be taken seriously.

IMPORTANT reminder regarding Measles: Public health officials urge people to avoid immediately going to a medical office if:
1. They are not immune AND
2. They have been exposed AND
3. They have symptoms
Instead, call a health care provider or urgent care center by telephone to create an entry plan to avoid exposing others in waiting rooms.

Getting vaccinated is a very effective way to prevent measles. People who are not immunized, or who have not received the full immunization, are at high risk of catching the disease. Now is a good time to check to see if you have been immunized. If you have not, there are several ways you can get vaccinated. Contact your insurance provider to see if the vaccine is covered at no charge. Anyone, regardless of insurance, can be vaccinated at the Public Health Department. If you are unsure of your immunity, your doctor can check with a simple blood test. Cuesta Student Health Center does not carry the vaccine or provide serology testing.

For Further Information For further information about measles, please call your local public health department or visit the www.cdc.gov/measles

Reference: Center for Disease Control

 

More info: Measles Information